Resting Heart Rate Chart - Normal and Post Exercise

Resting Heart Rate Chart – Normal and Post-Exercise

The resting pulse or heart rate is measured so as to find out if it is within the normal range. All of us have seen and felt the heart rate increase substantially while exercising. Resting heart rate refers to the pulse rate which is measured in a state of full rest, or after one has rested for around ten minutes. Resting heart rate refers to the number of times that the heart ‘beats per minute’, i.e. bpm, when a person is breathing slowing, sitting still, or lying down.

It may also be noted that identifying the normal RHR or ‘Resting Heart Rate’ also aids in assessment of the overall cardiac health. It lets a doctor verify whether or not the heart is efficiently pumping blood, and whether or not all the organs in the body are getting the necessary amounts of oxygen and blood.

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Heart rate chart

The resting heart rate chart for men, women, and children is presented below.

Resting heart rate chart for men

Age Excellent Average Poor
18 to 25 56 to 61 70 to 73 82 plus
26 to 35 55 to 61 71 to 74 82 plus
36 to 45 57 to 62 71 to 75 83 plus
46 to 55 58 to 63 72 to 76 84 plus
56 to 65 57 to 61 72 to 75 82 plus
65 Plus 56 to 61 70 to 73 80 plus

 

Resting heart rate chart for women

Age Excellent Average Poor
18 to 25 61 to 65 74 to 78 85 plus
26 to 35 60 to 64 73 to 76 83 plus
36 to 45 60 to 64 74 to 78 85 plus
46 to 55 61 to 65 74 to 77 84 plus
56 to 65 60 to 64 74 to 77 84 plus
65 plus 60 to 64 73 to 76 84 plus

 

Resting heart rate chart for boys

Age (In Years) Systolic Range Diastolic Range
3 104 to 113 63 to 67
4 106 to 115 66 to 71
5 108 to 116 69 to 74
6 109 to 117 72 to 76
7 110 to 119 74 to 78
8 111 to 120 75 to 80
9 113 to 121 76 to 81
10 114 to 123 77 to 82
11 116 to 125 78 to 83
12 119 to 127 79 to 83

 

Resting heart rate chart for girls

Age (In Years) SystolicRange Diastolic Range
3 104 to 110 65 to 68
4 105 to 111 67 to 71
5 107 to 113 69 to 73
6 108 to 114 71 to 75
7 110 to 116 73 to 76
8 112 to 118 74 to 78
9 114 to 120 75 to 79
10 116 to 122 77 to 80
11 118 to 124 78 to 83
12 120 to 126 79 to 82

Healthy or Normal Resting Heart Rate

The medical term for a high heart rate for long periods is tachycardia, while consistently low resting heart rate is referred to as bradycardia. Athletes have a healthy and strong heart as they engage in extensive physical training. Only minimal effort is required by such strong hearts to pump a higher quantity of blood. Hence well-trained athletes tend to have a low resting heart rate. A high resting heart rate indicates that the heart needs to put in a lot of effort to pump the required amounts of blood to the varied body organs.

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Adults have a normal resting heart rate ranging between 60 and 100. Newborns have an RHR between 100 and 160 till age 1. Children between 1 and 10 years have a normal RHR between 70 and 120, while it falls between 60 and 100 in teens aged 11 to 17. The normal resting heart rate in conditioned athletes ranges between 40 and 60 bpm.

Some factors which can affect the heart rate includes intensity of physical exertions, the position and size of the body, intake of certain medicines, the air/room temperature, the general fitness or health, and intense emotions such as anxiety, fear, panic attacks, anger, etc. Women also tend to elicit a slightly greater resting heart rate than men.

The heart rate of children differs as per weight, level of fitness, gender, lifestyle, etc. The blood pressure also tends to vary in children and the alterations in blood pressure can be measured with each heartbeat. The heart rate chart presented above shows the normal figures for systolic/maximum and diastolic/minimum pressures in children.

It is possible to predict the required heart rate during exercising after measuring the resting heart rate. People can decrease or increase the intensity of physical training after measuring their MHR or maximum heart rate permissible during exercising. Exercising over 85% of the MHR is not recommended.

Exercising with extremely high levels of heart rate is not beneficial. In fact, it increases the risk to orthopedic and cardiovascular conditions. Individuals who feel that they have an abnormal heart rate should consult a doctor.

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